Grant

Mallika Prasad and Ram Ganesh Kamatham

Grant Period: over six months

For a site-specific performance on an artificial climbing wall located within Phoenix Market City mall in Mahadevapura, Bangalore. The performance will be developed through a process of research into and experimentation with aerial movement, visual design, climbing techniques and urban art by the grantees who are actors and avid mountaineers.

Akansha Rastogi

Grant Period: Over one year

For the study and documentation of landmark art exhibitions in India from 1947 to the present. It will include those exhibitions that were planned but did not materialise, thereby attempting to create a framework by which to address and analyse how exhibitions typify attitudes, thoughts and articulations on contemporary art.

Naveen Mahantesh (080:30 Collective)

Grant Period: over six months

For a series of performance art interventions across various spaces in Bangalore by ten artists belonging to the 080:30 Collective. Each intervention will consist of several site-specific performances in areas like K R Market, Nayandanahalli Junction and Commercial Street in Bangalore. Each of the ten artists will work with five different spaces and their projects will be chosen through a process of discussion and evaluation within the collective. 

Anand Tharaney

Grant Period: One year and six months

For research into the popular subculture of automatons displayed during the Ganesh Chaturthi festival in Mumbai. His research will lead to the production of a film exploring the mythologies around these religious displays. The film will highlight the working of the low-tech automaton industry, while allowing for a creative and fictitious depiction of the research material in the form of a film. The collected material will also result in an installation piece.

Jeetin Rangher

Grant Period: over six months

For a series of site-specific performance art interventions at the Vinayaka Kalyana Mantapa, an abandoned building on Bellary Road that used to be a marriage hall until it was sliced in half during the construction of the road to the airport. 

Akkamahadevi LS and Shivanayak Dhore

Grant Period: Over one year and six months

For exploration of their local Jatres (traditional fairs) with students and peers. These grants will enable teachers to re-introduce Jatres around them as a storehouse of living traditions and relate them to a more rooted understanding of its relevance and help students contextualize the experience to their school texts. Engaging in an explorative journey through the eighteen months, they will document and also re-construct a Jatre within the school to celebrate with the village community.

Ratnakar Tripathy

Grant Period: Over one year

For research towards a monograph length essay on Sang-Ragini, a signature theatre tradition of Haryana, which combines theatre, ballad singing, music and dance. Studying the linkages between the music industry hubs of Delhi and Haryana, the research will map the construction of this form over time, and document the processes by which they are produced, distributed, marketed and consumed in both live and recorded formats.

Yousuf Saeed

Grant Period: Over one year

For the research and documentation of printed images from popular Urdu literature produced in the first half of the 20th century, leading to the creation of a curated website. This project will examine when and why Urdu went from being a mainstream language reflecting the cultural plurality of North India, to one associated with Islam.

Madhukar M L

Grant Period: Over ten months

For students from a government school in the village of Gumballi in Chamarajanagara district toengage in the rich tradition of folk art forms that celebrate the lush natural habitat of Chamarajanagara district, where the school is located, thereby addressing the environmental concerns of the region.

Ruchika Negi

Grant Period: Over one year

For research into a shawl painting tradition from Nagaland called Tsungkotepsu, towards an examination of the visual, material and social cultures of the Naga tribes. The study of Tsungkotepsu, as woven form of expression, will enhance understanding of how traditions reinvent themselves by merging with ‘larger’ traditions to ensure their own survival. The research will result in a monograph,a film, and the creation of puppets inspired by Tsungkotepsu motifs.

Prajna Hegde

Grant Period: Over ten months

For students from a government school in the village of Mantagi in Haveri district, to engage in a process of exploring a text from the school syllabus by interpreting it through local art forms.

Anushka Meenakshi

For research towards a film on work songs, known as Li, sung by the inhabitants of Phek village in Nagaland. These work songs and chants have no lyrics but are vocalizations, grunts and sighs that are transformed into polyphonic melodies, while their music makers are busy harvesting paddy. This research is a part of a larger project to document and share everyday music and rhythms from across India.

Gururaj L

Grant Period: Over ten months

For the empowerment of students from a government school in the village of Gudadoor in Koppal District, Karnataka, to creatively link their process of learning in the classroom with the local folk-art traditions that they are immersed in. This approach to classroom pedagogy seeks to combat the corrosive influence of popular culture on the ethos of the school.

Shumona Goel

Grant Period: Over one year

For the sturdy of vintage educational film footage the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) archives, produced as part of the Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) programme. This programme was established by NASA and ISRO in 1975-76 to impart a ‘modern and scientific outlook to rural India’. The fellowship outcome will be a symposium and, subject to availability of further funding from other sources, a film using the found footage.

Neha Choksi

Grant Period: Over one year

For research at various archives of science and astronomy and at Jain religious archives in India leading to a multi-part art project titled The Weather Inside Me. The project will trace the history of science, weather and solar observations in India from pre-colonial to post-colonial times. The religious archives will be referenced to investigate the centrality of the sun in Jainism and its resulting impact on time and memory in our lives.

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